The days between November 1st and 11th are a season of national remembering when people move from thinking about personal losses to remembering those who have died serving their country. Inevitably, even as people take part in Remembrance Sunday, they will also be remembering other losses in their lives.

There are few people who haven’t been touched by loss of some kind during the Covid-19 pandemic, so it will be an especially poignant time as more people search for meaning and hope.

Read on for ideas to help with reaching out into our communities, even though the usual patterns of worship will be different.

(NB If you need further resources for supporting bereaved families around this time, see the excellent Loss and Hope website.)

  • Child looking at a candle in church

    ‘Remembering’ Services

    These are the services held around All Souls’ Day which offer people an opportunity to remember those they love but see no longer, whether the loss is recent or long ago, and to support and maintain contact with bereaved families whether or not they have had a Church of England-led funeral.

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  • A church altar decorated with a poppy display, candles and a cross

    Remembrance Services

    Remembrance / Armistice Day services attract large congregations from every generation. For some of those people, it may be the only time they engage with church during the year. Despite restrictions on large gathering at this time, there are still ways to help make Remembrance positive, memorable and spiritual. Read on for some simple suggestions to help.

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